‘The Killing’ Procures A Suitable Ending For A Choppy Existence

The Killing Season 4

God, I had such high hopes for The Killing. Nothing I love more than detective stories, awesome. On a cable network boasting Mad Men and Breaking Bad, awesome. Setting it in the atmospheric and oft creepy area of Seattle, awesome.The previews made everything look perfectly moody, with the classic sparring opposites of detective partners I was all in. Everything was good, at least for the first couple episodes, and then everything slowly sliding out of control, things got more and more unbelievable and it became clear that in whatever way we weren’t going to satisfied by the ending. But, who would ever think that they wouldn’t even tell us the killer as the first season ended, incredible.

Of course, I watched the following seasons because I’m a masochist. Season 2 was even worse than the first, while season 3 had its moments, it still ultimately suffered the same fate. What always kept me going was the relationship between Holder and Linden, our two detectives, how often they were at odds with each other, but always held an affinity and curiosity in each other that always made their scenes click.

Netflix gave the multiple-times cancelled show a six-episode final fourth season, and it seemed like that’d be the perfect way to go out and for the most part it did just that. As always the Holder Linden relationship kept rolling and held everything together when things seemed on the frays. But, most importantly the nailed the scope and presence of their main case, it wasn’t anything big or something with huge twists and turns, but enough for six episodes that simply involved the a killing and the boys academy that surrounded it, enough for suspects and a main threat. Joan Allen got to cut her teeth perfectly as the head of the boys academy trying to protect their image as well as some secrets she wouldn’t want the police knowing. While this was going on the show still managed to deal with the fallout of season 3 as a B or a C story that was used sparingly enough not to take over or feel like a drag.

In the end it was a perfect ending for a imperfect show with many imperfections. Holder and Linden got perfect endings for who their characters were and realistically what would happen to them. They didn’t go out gracefully or with merit badges, but as troubled as they came in and uniformly connected through the bumps and bruises they procured together.

The 71st Annual Golden Globe Awards Reaction

(Reuters)

(Reuters)

Alright, so lets talk about some general actual Golden Globes ceremony shit before we get into the shit that actually matter (but, actually doesn’t as well). I’m an unabashed Ricky Gervais Golden Globes supporter, I’m a huge fan of his and absolutely loved when he was given the reigns to the show, and eventually a couple more. He was biting, funny and toed the line on not giving a fuck about who he was making fun of. Now, I love Tina Fey and Amy Poehler almost as much, and so I was sad last year when it wasn’t Gervais again, but Fey/Poehler were just as great. This year wasn’t any different and their monologue killed, with some great jokes on McConaughey, Clooney and DiCaprio.

As good as they are, they were sparingly seen throughout the telecast. As great as their straight-forward jokes are, I think they work best when they do bits. I always loved when they did those bits in the Emmys during the Best Comedic Actress category with all their nominees. Legend Julia Louis-Dreyfus played along with this in the monologue and later in the show, riffing off being nominated in film and TV, and it was wonderful. I liked the idea of Poehler playing off Kevin Bacon and Kyra Sedgwick’s daughter where she’s the onstage “shooer” (a technicale term), but it almost seemed to common-based SNL humour. But, yeah, Fey/Poehler were great, and if I can’t get Gervais, they’re really the next best.

Alright, so what the shit is up with giving Woody Allen the Cecil B. DeMille award if he’s not even going to be there? I mean, make no mistake, Allen deserved the award ten times over, but of course you know he’s not going to show up, so really why even bother. It’s incredibly weird dedicating 20 minutes to someone, and going so in depth on their career driving towards something so anti-climatic it just falls flat and then awkwardly going to commercial.

Actual winners, okay cool. Jennifer Lawrence is great in American Hustle, even if the film isn’t so itself and totally deserved to win. Lawrence is that great actress who can do actual awards calibre films along with blockbuster type films (“Hunger Games”) at the same time. Infinite props.

Bryan Cranston wins of course, and how was Liev Schreiber and James Spader nominated? lol

Breaking Bad won best dramatic series. WOW jk

I don’t know how Jon Voight wins for ‘Ray Donovan,’ I mean the show sucked, and he was alright, but there’s really no reason he wins against Josh Charles, who is great, Aaron Paul, who is terrific, and Corey Stoll who was fantastic and should have won.

I love Amy Adams, I really do, but I’m too much of a Before Midnight fan (which is a masterpiece) to let go that Julie Delpy didn’t win. Dreyfus and Gerwig were almost equally good to win. I mean, really I like them all, so it’s all good.

Robin Wright won best actress in a drama, which is fine, she was good, but I really didn’t think she was given all that much to do. She was good, but I don’t think the show really pushed her to do anything that great.

I loved Jared Leto winning, he was so deserving and I loved Dallas Buyers Club, even if it seems its been fallnig by the wayside in awards season, performances aside.

So stoked to see Spike Jonze win for writing Her. What a gorgeous film, not only visually, but how Jonze paced it all out.

How does Brooklyn Nine-Nine win best comedy? It’s an entirely fine, if slightly above average show, but to actually win? This was the most baffling award of the night. Not that the rest of the shows were that great, but I just don’t know how this wins, but I guess this was the Golden Globes. And also Andy Samberg wins? Again, the same as before, he’s funny, but award-worthy? Ehhhhhhhhhhh.

Amy Poehler wins for “Parks.” So happy, she’s the best, so much deserved.

Alfonso Cuaron was in the compnay of some great directors, but he was the most sensible winner. Not only was his film daring and different, but within it he created and pulled off something that didn’t seem possible a few years ago.

DiCaprio wins for best actor in a comedy which is hilarious as he said, Leo in a comedy, which is all sorts of great. But, really a tough category with Bale being amazing in American Hustle, Phonenix in Her, Isaac underratedly perfect in Inside Llewyn Davis and Bruce Dern supposedly great in Nebraska (which I’m so sad I haven’t seen yet).

American Hustle wins best comedy. Alright, then. It’s not like Her, Inside Llewyn Davis and The Wolf Of Wall Street were nominated against it…

Cate Blanchett winning for Blue Jasmine. Nice choice, even if I’m a Bullock fan myself.

I really love McConaughey winning for “Dallas” even if I think Ejiofor is more deserving. I’ve been in awe of Ejiofor’s performance since I’ve seen it, and think McConaughey would win in any other year, but hey, I guess it’s this year. McConaughey was so great, in his best role of his career, and pretty much turned me back into a fan of his.

Very happy that 12 Years A Slave won, after I thought it was falling by the wayside in awards season. I think Before Midnight is the best film of the year, but it’s too small to get any attention, and thus 12 Years A Slave is my second favourite film, and something that should be rewarded. Lets see if the moment pushed along to the Oscars.

My 12 Favourite TV Shows Of 2013

Enlightened Banner

So, these are my favourite shows of 2013. I’m not really going to call them the “best shows of 2013,” because that’s subjective and my mind is always changing, but these are the ones I enjoyed the most. And, yeah, don’t put too much stock in how I ranked them, because I have no clue, I like them all, and my opinion of them is always shifting and jockeying. In fact, I just thought of a new order to put them in…..

1. Enlightened

A simply beautiful show that masterfully handles comedy and drama better than either full-fledged dramas or comedies can. Elements of short stories and a long form narrative give the show everything it needs to be successful on a plot level. Laura Dern, Mike White, and Luke Wilson among others are perfect in their roles and inhibit areas of sadness that make their characters feel so, so real. I’m crushed it won’t get a third season, but I’m happy with what we got.

2. Breaking Bad

Not as high on it as a lot of people, but I still greatly enjoyed the ride. That’s the keyword, “ride.” I don’t think the show is particularly all that great, or even close to the best show of all time, but it was damn fun, suspenseful and entertaining that actually got me counting down until the next episode aired.

3. The Americans

The best new show of the year, a spy drama in the 80s. Faced under Cold War pre-texts a married Russian spy couple goes undercover in the States. Not only is it a action drama in that sense, but it also gets great depth out of it’s portrayal of a forced together and crumbling marriage and how to deal with these emotions in the face of geo-politics.

4. Orange Is The New Black

Even better than I anticipated after all of the hype. Mainly focalized in a women’s prison, it allowed the show to work through a formed structure and keep the action clicking along under one roof. Very funny and dark, and mixes these two elements perfectly.

5. The Good Wife

Has always been good, but season five has pushed things to a new level. After Alicia and co. have moved on from Lockhart/Gardner they face all sorts of new problems dealing with their own firm, and the fall out from where the once came. The best show on network TV, a procedural, but bucks all preconceived notions that come with that title, keeping it fresh every episode.

6. Hannibal

The most surprising show that not only turned out to be good, but was often great in spots. One of the few shows to have actual imagery that was frightening and rivaling most current horror movies. Hugh Dancy is utterly perfect as Will Graham, a frayed and conflicted Special Agent who gets unraveled to his last piece of yarn. Mads Mikkelsen is equally chilling as Hannibal, driving the suspense to a constant peak. I’m not sure what season two will bring, a lot of shit went down at the end of the first, but I’m just glad we’re getting some more of the show.

7. Justified

Consistently one of the best shows on TV. Olyphant continues to own the role, really like he was born to play it, and just oozes cool at every step. They always tell a compelling, intertwining and smart story with enough action and twists and turns to keep you guessing. The odd stand-alone episode only further cements how great this show is, and how in control of its motives it truly is.

8. Masters Of Sex

Was very unsure and luke-warm to the show at first, but progressively grew on me as the episodes wore on. As the sex studies experiments became more in-depth and real so did the relationships that it accidentally affected and changed for the better or worse. Michael Sheen is great as the withdrawn and calculated Masters, while Lizzy Caplan puts in excellent work as the driven assistant who becomes much more than that.

9. Mad Men

A down year of the show in my eyes, not that it wasn’t any good, but to the standards I hold this show (one of my favourites of all time), it wasn’t what I had hoped.

10. Game Of Thrones

I really like this show, but sometimes it becomes a slog for me becuase I really can’t stand fantasy. That being said, there were some fantastic episodes, of course “The Rains Of Castamere,” and there’s usually always some crazy shit going down or about to go down, with seemingly nobody safe.

11. Treme

I like this show a lot more than most, but I see why others don’t like it. Yeah, it comes off boring and not much plot propulsion, but it really is just about the characters, the city and the atmosphere of these intertwining people and the short stories trying to recover in their own way from disaster.

12. Homeland

Yeah, I was pretty disappointed with season three, and it turned me off of a lot of the show, but goddamn if I still like watching and see what ridiculous well they go to next. It’s an entirely different show from when it started out, and I never really know what they’re going to do next. That’s pretty much it, I look forward to watching the show still, and they continue to somehow keep roping me back in.

‘Breaking Bad’: “Felina” And How It All Stacks Up

Breaking Bad Banner

Breaking Bad has been all the rage, the past weeks, months and past couple years, and rightfully so. It finished up its fine run this evening and quite literally everyone in my Internet and IRL circle is tweeting, talking, blogging or writing about it, so time for me to throw my hat into the ring.

I got into the show right in time to see the season 3 finale on TV. My interest had always been piqued as it was a pretty unique set-up that seemed ripe for a good show, chemistry teacher turned meth cooker, and I was (and still am) the biggest fan of its AMC counter-part Mad Men, so I binged-watched and found myself at the season finale.   Now I really like Breaking Bad, but I’ve never loved it. In fact, I wasn’t a fan at all really though seasons 1 and 2, and it wasn’t until the conclusion of season 3 that I really started to like the show. Season 3 was the first real inkling to me that things weren’t just ratcheting up tension wise for the season, but that these ramifications would be felt going forward, with no one likely to forget these past mistakes. Actually, I take that back, I did love season 4, it’s by far my favourite of the seasons and such an awesome thrill ride and flawless back six or so episodes that is some of the most entertaining and fun television I’ve ever seen. I think that’s what it boils down to for me, Breaking Bad is a well-acted and plotted action movie (or series) with plenty of twists and turns and big bads and quotable lines, it’s just a ton of fun to be along for the ride. Yes, technically it does all this to a grade-A level, the writing is fantastic and so is the action, but boiled down to its parts, it’s a grand action/adventure story that happens to suck everybody in with it’s formula.

I enjoyed “Felina” as a ending chapter for the show, but I did have my own restraints with how certain things were left and how we came to them. For the sake of keeping this concise, I’ll focus solely on the lacking, because if you want some rah-rah Breaking Bad coverage, I’ll point you to a thousand different other places on the web. What Breaking Bad normally runs on, tensions, twists, turns and the unknown was largely avoided, where Walt’s game plan and the end were spelled out quite clearly. It’s known early on the battery powered 360 degree machine gun Walt is building, when he drives his car in the compound you know what’s going to happen, when he does his own park job you know what’s going to happen, when he grabs his keys you know what’s going to happen. Everything we know, it’s just a matter of letting it play out in front of us.

Honestly, I didn’t think things would get wrapped up so cleanly. I’m largely fine with the idea that Walt dies in a state of peace, but it does feel largely detached, this episode as well, from what the past two seasons have been driving towards, especially within Walt’s motives and his frame of mind. He’s alienated still largely from his family, but he dies knowing Walt Jr. is living healthy with money surely on its way, he’s on better terms with Skylar after their conversation, with her feeling some elements of remorse, whether she fully extends it or not, and Holly will be given a good life being raised by her mother, even if she’s ever absent of the good and bad memories of her father. Jesse gets to have his revenge on his captures, a last show of a semblance of mutual respect between him and Walt on some level, it still remains no matter what, then he’s driving off into the distance, trading the blue for greener pastures.

In the face of dealing with how he would end things compared to controversial finales from The Sopranos and Lost, Vince Gilligan stated he was a fan of closure, not leaving large questions or threads dangling and not living the state of a character in limbo. And, hey, I guess he wasn’t lying. I like both sides of the coin, wrapping everything up in a nice package or leaving things dangling as debatable mystery and talking point until the end of time, as long as they’re done faithfully to the material that came before it. I praise Vince Gilligan for giving us our answers, largely the ones we expected, or at least hoped, with Jesse becoming free and Walt paying for his crimes by the ultimate law, death, but even still regains redemptive qualities for how he went out, on his own terms. The finale to me felt like it was from a different show, or at least a different version of the show that we hadn’t been watching. It was tight, clean to the point, when largely the show in the past’s been loose, gritty and willing to string you along in places. Of course, this is the finale, so by nature they have to do some wrapping up, but you don’t ditch the girl who brought you to the dance in the first place even when the night is ending. I liked the finale for what it was, but I just wished I could’ve liked it more for what Breaking Bad was.

A quick little thing that I didn’t really wanna bring up, since it doesn’t really fit anywhere, but I feel so compelled to, that I just had to. Regardless, whether I loved or hated the finale or the show (I liked it! I really did! Even if it barely comes across), it’s insane to me scrolling through Twitter how many people from different walks of life, from sports, entertainment, politics, fathers, sons, daughters, mothers, cousins, barn animals, that weird kid in your class, that guy who for some reason always talks to you at work, are so quick and rash that not only was that the greatest ending of all time, but that Breaking Bad is the greatest show of all time. Now, I’m not going to get into a greatest show of all time debate right now, although I’d love to, but passing judgment this soon is aways comical, even if we have the full story already. Now, I’m not gonna say that things like The Sopranos, The Wire, The Shield and Mad Men (barring an insanely bad final season) are better than Breaking Bad, okay, I will, but I’ll let you have this night. Speaking to my larger point in my second paragraph, almost everybody, from all walks of life, or ranging demographics, or sex groups or whatever is so willing and easily able to call it the best show of all time. It’s because the show is so much more accessible and easy to palate than a “Sopranos” or The Wire or Mad Men, shows that lesser people, and many Breaking Bad fans, not all, would classify as “boring,” “slow,” or hard to get into. They don’t always crash along like Breaking Bad, or as exciting on the surface level, so they’re automatically not as good to the casual layabout because they’re harder to get into and you have to pay attention more.

That’s why Breaking Bad is so akin to an action movie or series, it’s broad enough that largely everyone can enjoy some facet of it, there’s twists and turns to keep you coming back, cliff hangers and cool memes to make out of it for the kids. It’s so much easier to get into, where while it’s an often really good show, it’s gloss tricks people into thinking how great it was and is. I’m really curious to see truly how much of a pedestal, if at all, history will let Breaking Bad share with already defined hallmarks of television of this ilk in The Sopranos and The Wire. Breaking Bad has and always will be the little brother to these shows, occasionally grabbing a sneak-attack win over its cunning older sibling, but largely remains in the shadows. Who knows, maybe future people who type on a keyboard and think about these things really will hold it in that regard, maybe, I’m a hater, or maybe we just all have to stop taking these things too seriously, enjoy all the great television we have, and succumb to its number one goal, to be entertained.

65th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards Wrap-Up

(Getty Images)

(Getty Images)

Welp, the Emmys were something that happened last night, and oh, boy, were they terrible. I’m talking like worst I’ve ever seen. Bit after bit fell dead, and even while NPH was his usual charming, affable self, he didn’t do much to elevate the dead material. I usually quite enjoy the opening video or whatever excuse they use to plod out a bunch of celebs and lampoon the hit shows, but that was not to be seen. Instead, we watch NPH binge-watch a bunch of TV, and then the ghosts of Emmy hosting past came out, with Conan O’Brien literally looking like a ghost. We got some NPH dancing finally late, but then they gave over way too much time to the choreography category to give them a bit. Which is fine, I guess, but in the grand scheme of things it echoed a larger problem with the show in time management and allocation of things that ran too long, and stuff that could’ve been easily cut. I thought it was an alright idea to single out some of the bigger deaths of the year and have a close friend talk about them, but then some seemed so disconnected from the show and following a weird ‘60s theme that nobody was aware they were doing. A tribute to the 1960s by Carrie Underwood? Alright. Elton John singing one of his own songs (I think) as a tribute to Liberace, just because his bio-pic was nominated? Alright. There was just some weird, weird decisions that never worked individually or even in any sort of whole. Hey, now, on to the actual awards…

Man, what the hell happened here? There were surprises galore, and people I had written of to having no chance of winning, were walking out of the building with a new trophy. I’m terrible at predicting the Emmys, but even this year was an extra special disaster zone for me. Merritt Wever won, which was like whoa, I love her and all, she’s so, so great, but I never thought anybody would win something for last season of Nurse Jackie. Tony Hale and JLD won for Veep, which is awesome because that show is great, but I didn’t think JLD would actually win her fourth and Tony Hale like whoa. Jim Parsons won and well, yeah, even that wasn’t gonna change this year. Jeff Daniels now has a Emmy for best lead actor in a drama and hahaha, but what exactly is happening here? Now, Daniels is alright in The Newsroom, he’s good for what it is, but doesn’t hold a candle to the mainstays of Cranston, Lewis, Hamm and even Spacey. This pretty much assures that Jon Hamm will be the Steve Carell of the best actor drama category, never winning the awards for something he deserved so many times over. Bobby Cannavale now has an Emmy as well, and I did quite enjoy him on “Boardwalk,” but didn’t think he’d actually win. A well-deserved and yet again surprising win. Anna Gunn won, which I happily called, and now all the top three leads have at least one Emmy, with a fantastic chance to win another one next year. Claire Danes won, and water is also wet. Modern Family of course wasn’t going to get shut out all the way, Steve Levitan sauntered up the stage to deliver his annual acceptance speech for best comedy, and yeah. Best drama, running high off it being the most buzzworthy show now, Breaking Bad took home the title, and I of course thought there was a good chance, but thought a House Of Cards, Mad Men, or even the shaky season of Homeland would still beat it out. It’s going to be very hard to beat Breaking Bad next year, in basically all the dramatic categories, but there’s still a year left, let’s see what shakes out and hopefully we’re left with a better overall show next year. I can dream.

65th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards Predictions

NPH 2013 Emmys

Alright, so the Emmys are tonight, and I’ve been pretty sparse on this here blog, which I’m trying to change, so let’s predict some Emmy winners! I’ll pick two, the one who I THINK is going to win, and the one who DESERVES to win.

Also, I should say that I’m uniformly pretty terrible at predicting awards show winners, and this year is especially tricky where I could see things going either way and I wouldn’t be surprised in the least with whoever wins. This is also a clever little fallback disclaimer that I can rely on when come Sunday night all my picks are wrong. Let’s do this.

Outstanding Drama Series:

This is a prime example where I could see it going multiple ways and not being surprised. Mad Men was a king crusher until Homeland came along and won last year. Mad Men’s as good as its ever been and I wouldn’t be surprised if it won. Homeland won last year for a terrific season of TV, but season 2 was pretty lackluster in spots and a definite step down, but, hey, sometimes the academy is dumb and just votes on name. Breaking Bad is what everybody’s obsessing over now, its never won one of these, but its got that acting category on lock. It’s good as well, and deserving, so, maybe. The new kid on the block, House Of Cards was pretty much tailored to win Emmys, and it’s alright, but not deserving, but again, it’s the type of show that the academy LOVES. Game Of Thrones was good too, but still a little too out of the Emmy wheelhouse to actually win. So, yeah, I’m gonna say House Of Cards wins, while I personally would give it to Mad Men to win. It could go so many ways, though.

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Drama Series:

I’ll come right out and say that Kevin Spacey wins this, and I feel semi-pretty good in that. He’s got the name recognition, everybody loves him and he was pretty good. Most deserving? I’d say Damian Lewis, a lot was demanded out of him in season 2 of Homeland and how he was able to flip the script and shift into different modes and sides of Brody was some awe-inspiring work.

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Drama Series:

Claire Danes deserves it and wins it on Sunday. No real competition here, she was fantastic yet again. Robin Wright was good, if never given much to do, and I guess Elisabeth Moss is the next threat, but, nah, Danes got this thing. If I had my way though, Connie Britton would win, because I love her more than most of my family members, and she’s awesome and everything positive should go her way. Connie 4 lyfe.

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Drama Series:

I think Peter Dinklage wins this thing again, but Mandy Patinkin is the most deserving. Dinklage is great, and although not as good in this last season of GoT, I still think he gets it again. Patinkin is arguably the best part of Homeland and he’s just fantastic. Plus, that fedora and beard. The man knows old man chic.

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Drama Series:

I’m going to say Anna Gunn wins this, but I’m not really that confident in it. Nobody else really jumps out at me, even while I enjoy every single nominees work on their show. I don’t even know who’s most deserving, so, hey, Emmys, just make it a six-way tie. Emmys for everybody.

Outstanding Comedy Series:

We all know Louie should and deserves to win this thang, but that just ain’t gonna happen, because we live in a cruel and unjust world. So, say hello to The Big Bang Theory or Modern Family winning. Modern Family is not a good show, but it was slightly better this year. I’ve stopped watching The Big Bang Theory for awhile now, but people tell me it’s on kind of an uptick and doing good things, so it wins tomorrow. You guys can all wear your totally awesome BAZINGA! shirts in celebration. You know you want to.

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Comedy Series:

Do you think Alec Baldwin is gonna win this thing for the 395th time? I don’t know, but I think there’s something in his contract that even now with 30 Rock off the air, he’ll continue to be nominated into eternity, a forever reminding cloud that makes you question your life just so, because what kind of world would it be if Alec Baldwin had to cease being nominated in this category. What kind of world I ask of you. Anyways, Jim Parsons wins, but Louis C.K. is most deserving.

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Comedy Series:

Strong candidates abound and I love them all, except one. I’ll let you figure out which one that is. JLD ain’t gonna win this again, though I love her so. I don’t think they give it to Tina Fey even though it’s her swan song. No on Dunham and Falco. So, Amy Poehler wins and Laura Dern is so, so deserving of it. Writing this just reminded that Enlightened is gone, and I’m so sad now, guyz. You should watch it if you haven’t, it’s such a beautifully poignant, sad, funny and uplifting show. Please, someone give Mike White another show.

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Comedy Series:

Ty Burell wins this, and yeah, I think he deserves it. I absolutely loved Burell in the first seaon of MF, but just got tired of his schtick. I’ve come around, it is what it is, I love Ty Burell, he’s funny, so give him the Emmy.

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Comedy Series:

Sadly, I think Sofia Vergara wins this. I can’t stand her because the show only derives two outlets of comedy from her, her nationality, and how hot she is (I’d argue against her perceived attractiveness, but, hey, that’s just me a sane straight male). Jane Krakowski deserves this to the world’s end, because she’s been my favourite thing about 30 Rock since it began. She is so great, I can’t even function how good she was on that show and never gets any recognition for it. Krakowski 4 lyfe.

Outstanding Miniseries or Movie:

I’ve only seen a couple of these, but knowing things I’d say Behind The Candelabra wins and deserves it.

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Miniseries Or Movie:

Emmys just can’t wait to give Michael Douglas an Emmy. Wins and deserves.

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Miniseries Or Movie:

Again, the Emmys love their old, distinguished and creditable thespians (am I using that word right?). Jessica Lange wins, and deserves because the only other one in the category I’ve seen was Laura Linney in The Big C, and no, just no.

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Miniseries Or Movie:

I’m gonna say the American Horror Story love doesn’t leave Lange, so Scott Bakula continues the “Candelabra” love. I don’t know, maybe the Emmys might really love Zachary Quinto. Who knows.

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Miniseries Or Movie:

Man, I have no clue. I think Political Animals was bad, I don’t know, I didn’t watch it. So, lets say Ellen Burstyn wins because she’s an OG and just great and kinda looks like all of our grandmothers. Sarah Paulson was cool and had commitment for days in AHS, so maybe she pulls the rug out.

Outstanding Variety Series:

The Daily Show, are you even kidding with other nominees? It’s the don mega of variety series. Which is, like, the most broad category ever.

Outstanding Reality – Competition Program:

Where’s Big Brother? Hahaha, I’m a jokester, but seriously I don’t watch any of this. The Amazing Race had the crown for awhile, until Top Chef screwed it up a few years back. I don’t really care, but we’ll say Phil Keoghan and company retain the award. I haven’t watched it since, like, Reichen and Chip just totally Jordan/Pippen’ed the entire show.

Let’s keep going, because why not, I have nothing better to do on a Saturday night

Outstanding Directing For A Drama Series:

You’ve gotta be dreaming if you think David Fincher doesn’t win this. An A-list director directs one of the most anticipated and Emmy bait shows of the past year? Get outta here. I think my girl Michelle MacLaren deserves this, though.

Outstanding Directing For A Comedy Series:

“New Year’s Eve” is such a beautiful piece of television that C.K.’s gotta win. I’d like to think that the academy has started to turn even more towards C.K. after last year, and less towards the perennials of Modern Family and Glee and such. They probably haven’t, but I’m gonna stick with C.K. winning.

Outstanding Directing For A Miniseries, Movie Or A Dramatic Special:

Steven Soderbergh is the boss and he wins this. Hahaha, you actually thought dude was retiring to paint?

Outstanding Directing For A Variety Series:

Man, I don’t know. None of these have real unique directing styles except for Portlandia. Maybe, it wins because of this. But, lets just give it to The Daily Show because they haven’t won enough. I don’t know.

Outstanding Writing For A Drama Series:

I was going to say that one of those Breaking Bad episodes was gonna win, but I completely forgot about “Q&A,” because I’m an idiot, with it being a jaw agape hour of television written by the late and forever great Henry Bromell. He’s gotta win.

Outstanding Writing For A Comedy Series:

Louie, Louie, Louieeeee. And Pamela Adlon. They’ve got this in the bag, with a decidedly weird and inventive episode.

Outstanding Writing For A Miniseries, Movie, Or A Dramatic Special:

Behind The Candelabra, please come and accept another award.

Outstanding Writing For A Variety Series:

The Daily Show, please come and accept another award.

Outstanding Choreography:

What? You think we’re not gonna talk about choreography? Of course we are. Some would argue that it is the most important category, and I cast myself as chief among them. Some would also say that I always forget how many goddamn Emmys categories there are, and I’m just reading these off the Wikipedia page. That could also be true. Good thing I also always forget that the Creative Arts Emmys are a thing, as well. Anyways, my girl cousins like that So You Think You Can Dance show, so one of its four nominees wins. Let’s say the “Sonya Tayeh” one wins, sounds like a cool enough name.

So, I hope this was all informative. No real need to watch the Emmys now I guess, sorry for the spoilers, but whatever, watch Breaking Bad instead or the sure to be cracking Dexter series finale. All the props to you if you read this far, but I think my own eyes glossed over this thing about halfway through. Happy Emmys watching, I’m gonna go watch some hockey.

Remembering James Gandolfini

(HBO)

(HBO)

Within the last couple years I was able to re-watch the entire series of The Sopranos, and whether it’s my time away from the program, my evolving “experience” in TV watching (lets pretend thats a thing), or whatever it was, I was completely bulled over by both the largeness and intimateness of the show. Something clicked in this run through of the series that really coalesced it’s elements into becoming my favourite TV show of all time (give or take The Simpsons), somewhat suddenly in the confidence of its proceedings. Season 6, the ultimate turning point for me, originally my least favourite season, opened up Pandora’s box this time around and it became my favouirte of the series, all perfect episodes mixed in with maybe two sub-par entries. Of course, there’s a lynch pin to everything that runs through The Sopranos gambit, a wholly defining entity.  The whole show spins out of one central aspect, the one that has shaped my love of TV and progressed it further as a medium than can even be defined now, one character of Tony Soprano, played by the late James Gandolfini.

James Gandolfini’s performance as Tony Soprano is the greatest televison acting display I have ever seen on the medium. Now, obviously I haven’t seen every show ever made, but in my own conscious I can say without a doubt that I haven’t seen a better and more commanding piece of work than what Gandolfini play-acted, and I doubt I’ll see any better. He was so good that simultaneously it seemed like Gandolfini just rolled into set and wasn’t even acting at all, like this was a documentary, while the next minute his grandiose acting style would come out in full force. The thing is, though, I fucking hated Tony Soprano, as a character he was an asshole, backstabber, liar, selfish sonuvabitch who’s only saving grace at times seemed to be his admiration for his family, which was even tested at times. But, like many anti-hero led shows like The Shield, Breaking Bad and Mad Men among others, even though you might hate the character, you become utterly fascinated by their machinations, what makes them tick, and everything builds up for them only for it to be torn down. Gandolfini’s real-life pain bled into Tony Soprano and it showed to a tragic end in his acting method and our finished product on screen. Drinking and drug problems, and anxiety in his own acting abilities led to his struggles and dedication to getting the character right. We’re all in debt to Gandolfini no matter what manner you like The Sopranos or any measure of TV in general. His performance paved the way for basically all the anti-hero, and strong dramatic cable dramas you see on your TV now. There aren’t enough adjectives for me to continually describe how great Gandolfini was in The Sopranos, as well as everything else he did, and doing so would just be redundant.

While The Sopranos was Gandolfini’s break-out role, and one in which he was the lead star, he was just as great and memorable in bit film parts throughout his career that always carried weight no matter how long he spent on screen. Whether it was in True Romance, The Mexican, The Man Who Wasn’t There, In The Loop, Zero Dark Thirty or the presence of his inimitable voice in Where The Wild Things Are, Gandolfini was never featured all that prominently in film, but he was always recognized and remembered, sometimes providing humour or just by being that looming figure that lurked on the edges of the entire film. Even as recent as one of his last films in Killing Them Softly, one I wasn’t overly fond of, but through it like always, Gandolfini’s performance, as with the others, helped hold the film together and provide some humanistic elements that Gandolfini’s raw power always seems to deliver.

It’s still hard for me to comprehend that James Gandolfini isn’t with us anymore. Of course, I’ve never met him or anything like that, but The Sopranos is so much of a part of me and the cornerstone of why I like the medium of TV in the first place, it feels like I’m missing a part of me. James Gandolfini and the show as a whole gave me so much towards what you could do on television, how it could be bette than film, the performances it could harvest, the deep rooted themes it could explore, and the connections that could be built over 6 seasons and 86 episodes. We all owe Gandolfini a debt of gratitude for all the blood, sweat and tears that he shed for the show, the character, and the medium that saw a mini revolution under his eyes. While James Gandolfini is no longer with us, Tony Soprano still is and will always be, along with countless other memorable performances, laying in wait just ready to show us a side of Gandolfini that we never recognized before, an alternative view to a masterpiece.