‘The Killing’ Procures A Suitable Ending For A Choppy Existence

The Killing Season 4

God, I had such high hopes for The Killing. Nothing I love more than detective stories, awesome. On a cable network boasting Mad Men and Breaking Bad, awesome. Setting it in the atmospheric and oft creepy area of Seattle, awesome.The previews made everything look perfectly moody, with the classic sparring opposites of detective partners I was all in. Everything was good, at least for the first couple episodes, and then everything slowly sliding out of control, things got more and more unbelievable and it became clear that in whatever way we weren’t going to satisfied by the ending. But, who would ever think that they wouldn’t even tell us the killer as the first season ended, incredible.

Of course, I watched the following seasons because I’m a masochist. Season 2 was even worse than the first, while season 3 had its moments, it still ultimately suffered the same fate. What always kept me going was the relationship between Holder and Linden, our two detectives, how often they were at odds with each other, but always held an affinity and curiosity in each other that always made their scenes click.

Netflix gave the multiple-times cancelled show a six-episode final fourth season, and it seemed like that’d be the perfect way to go out and for the most part it did just that. As always the Holder Linden relationship kept rolling and held everything together when things seemed on the frays. But, most importantly the nailed the scope and presence of their main case, it wasn’t anything big or something with huge twists and turns, but enough for six episodes that simply involved the a killing and the boys academy that surrounded it, enough for suspects and a main threat. Joan Allen got to cut her teeth perfectly as the head of the boys academy trying to protect their image as well as some secrets she wouldn’t want the police knowing. While this was going on the show still managed to deal with the fallout of season 3 as a B or a C story that was used sparingly enough not to take over or feel like a drag.

In the end it was a perfect ending for a imperfect show with many imperfections. Holder and Linden got perfect endings for who their characters were and realistically what would happen to them. They didn’t go out gracefully or with merit badges, but as troubled as they came in and uniformly connected through the bumps and bruises they procured together.

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