Emmy Awards 2012

The Emmy’s were relatively fine tonight, even if they seemed like a retread of years’ past. ‘Louie’ and ‘Homeland’ received some awards, but beyond them what really seemed new? ‘Modern Family’ sadly continued their steamroll through the awards even as Nolan Gould and Rico Rodriguez remained the only good parts from the show (prove me wrong). We were delivered an Emmys that was slightly different, but lets face it, was pretty much the exact same as we’ve seen in years’ past.

For years now I’ve been a champion for Jimmy Kimmel hosting the Oscars. I’ve simply had enough with these random non-comedians who have hosted the Oscars of late and have no comedic timing and are relegated to dumb musical numbers (I’m looking at you Hugh Jackman, James Franco and Anne Hathaway). I’m a traditionalist and love when a hard to the core comedian hosts an awards show and does a solid 10 minute monologue rather than some silly musical number. History has shown how great legitimate stand-up comedians have done at awards shows like Whoopi Goldberg, Ellen DeGeneres, Chris Rock and Jon Stewart (even though he’s not really a stand-up comedian). I’ve always enjoyed Jimmy Kimmel from ‘The Man Show’ through ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live’ and since he is based off ABC, would be a perfect Oscars or Emmys host. Ultimately, he was solid, fine in the monologue, not great, but as the night wore on, like all hosts, was given less to do and hardly felt like a presence. He didn’t really do anything wrong, but wasn’t spectacular either, and nowadays I guess that’s the best you can expect from an Emmys host.

Because I don’t want this to drag on forever, I’m not gonna break-down every category, but instead just the ones that effected or impacted me the most.

Ummm, so, Louis C.K., won for best writing in a comedy series and for best writing in a variety special. He simultaneously seemed grateful and reticent when receiving these much deserved awards. ‘Louie’ is one of the best shows on TV, and even if a conservative show like the Emmys will recognize it’s writing, I’ll be happy.

But, just when you think the Emmys is being awesome and giving Louis C.K. awards, they also keep giving ‘Modern Family’ and its cast members awards as well as goddamn Jon Cryer. Like, c’mon, I thought we were at least past giving Jon Cryer another fucking award for the lowest common denominator of comedy. ‘Modern Family’ is another show that scrapes the bottom of the barrel for ‘Two And A Half Men’-esque racial and sexist jokes.

Okay, now lets get to the awesome stuff, namely Julia Louis-Dreyfus winning for Best Actress in a Comedy for ‘Veep’. I’ve recently found out through Twitter that there’s actually quite a few people who don’t like ‘Veep’ for some reason? Okay, I guess you don’t like smart political jokes, name-calling, layered jokes and acidic come-backs, that’s cool for you though. Think about this, forget about the ‘Seinfeld’ curse, JLD has won an Emmy for ‘Seinfeld’, ‘The New Adventures Of Old Christine’, and now ‘Veep’, that is quite the accomplishment for the comedic goddess who we shorten to JLD.

If you know me at all, you’ll know my undying love for ‘Homeland’, my favourite show of last year. Now, Claire Danes was an absolute lock for Best Actress, and wasn’t she just adorable/deserving accepting it? I thought Damian Lewis would have a good chance to win Best Actor, but thought it might slip away. Little did I know, the Academy decided to slay Bryan Cranston, and give the award to Lewis, I’m not complaining. Again, I thought Best Drama was a possibility, but not an actuality, but little did I know ‘Homeland’ would take home all the gold.

There really isn’t much to say about this mediocre edition of the Emmys. It was all pretty par for the course, besides the ‘Homeland’ victories, which when you look back aren’t all that much of a surprise. Louis C.K.’s wins were beyond awesome but not completely surprising as everyone knew how great they were, but just took the Academy to notice. Otherwise, we were left with dumb ‘Modern Family’ winning everything, a lackluster HBO movie (‘Game Change’) and other bits and pieces that were easily predicted, such as Lange, Paul, Smith and Moore winning.

There was some nice surprises, and solid wins, but more of the same dominated the Emmys, who had hardly even deserved Emmys in their “best” seasons. Some new blood was nice, but when there’s so much of the old, do we really recognize the new? Or is it just a bump in the road?

Also, Lena Dunham is all sorts of awful.

‘Damages’ – “It All Came Down To This” — A Series Review

I don’t think this is really going to be a series finale, or really even a season five review, but more of a series review and my feelings on this show as a whole. I feel obligated to write about this show since I love it so much, have stuck with it since the beginning through thick and thin, and, well because no one else really talks about it anymore (or ever). I don’t even know where to begin with ‘Damages’, I’m not even sure why I started watching it in the first place. Up here in Canada, the first few season were on Showcase, and since I was just getting into television seriously, this seemed like an “adult” show that would demand my attention and speak to me more strongly in the medium more than any other lazy network show I was programed to watch in the beginning ever would.

I kinda like shows and films that play with form and twists. Both of these things can be incredibly cheesy and gimmicky if used wrong, and surely throughout its time, ‘Damages’ has been guilty a few times, but I love it anyways because I’m a sucker for smart writing and plotting, even if it is a bit outrageous and disingenuous to its previous ideas. I’m not even entirely sure if Kessler/Kessler/Zelman truly wanted this to be a great or heralded show. Of course, I know, like everybody they’d want their show to be great, but I really don’t think they focused too much on making a “classic” show, but one that they enjoyed taking people for a ride on. Just take a look at the episode titles from season one on, tongue-in-cheek all the way, show they were having a lot of fun.

I don’t entirely know why I like this so much, but I know that Rose Byrne and Glenn Close are the lynch pin. Like most, this was my first exposure to Rose Byrne, she was smart, wry, didn’t take much shit and uh, yeah, gorgeous. There was also this actress named, Glenn Close, ever heard of her? Whooooo boy, Can I just dedicate the rest of this article to how great Glenn Close is, like, c’mon. She’d been enjoying a terrific film career for over 20 years when she came to the show. Now, of course, by 2007 it was getting more common place for name actors to head-up a TV show, but even still. When she showed up on ‘The Shield’ in 2005 that was still before MOST people realized the turning tide in TV over film. I love Glenn Close in this role because she is such a diabolical, cold, and calculated person, but I’m pretty sure she is like the nicest person in real life. Like, I’ve seen her being interviewed and she is just incredibly nice, but in ‘Damages’, all these cliches like “tour-de-force” and “powerhouse” are grossly underrated, just incredible times a thousand. Glenn Close gave her goddamn all to ‘Damages’ for five years, surely sacrificed some quality film work, and while noticed early on in awards recognition, was slowly put aside for others. This woman was Cruela de Vil, for godssake, and I’m pretty sure in real life she’s nicer than your priest. Apply this contrast to ‘Damages’, and that’s acting, ladies and gentleman.

I understand how all the flash forwards, and their revelations and backtracking can frustrate a viewer, but this isn’t a Russian novel, people. Kessler/Kessler/Zelman weren’t trying to be ‘The Wire’ (even though they casted a few actors from such show), this is the type of stuff latter-day Aaron Sorkin wishes he could. Actually smart television that doesn’t buff up people into thinking they’re smarter than they actually are. I’m returning to this well, but I think Kesslerx2 and company maybe thought with the first season they were attempting to embark on television greatness, and indeed they were close. But, there ability to strive for this perfect greatness in order to tell compelling TV was good, but playing with form, twists and some dry humour, maybe tipped the hat towards good, not great television. They eventually didn’t give a shit and made the television show they wanted. Going from DirecTV was a challenge, and certainly below par from what they did on FX. But, nobody can accuse ‘Damages’ of being unfaithful or straying from its identity.

Lastly, I want to touch on something that not nearly enough people talk about with this show (if all). In a television landscape that is basically dominated by men, we get a show with two female leads, who are incredibly strong women, in their own rights, who handle shit on their own without a man or someone to guide them. Yes, Ellen and Patty are themselves, they just happen to be women and they are intellectually and mentally stronger than most goddamn men on television. This show is a breathe of fresh air, where, hey! Two women are the main characters! And will you get this, they aren’t physically or mentally weak, they aren’t reacted on, they are the product. These are strong women in television, and I don’t know if ‘Damages’ will have a true legacy, but if it does at all, I truly wish it is that strong women can carry a show and can be just as strong, sympathetic, unforgivable and bankable as men. Beautiful women anchor this show, tormented women anchor this show, strong women anchor this show, women anchor this show. In a world of anti-heroes on cable like Tony Soprano, Dexter Morgan, Vic Mackey, Tommy Gavin and others, ’Damage’s was a special show that dipped in and out of “hero” and “anti-hero” characteristics with these women. But, let’s not forget, it was women that drove not only the power and emotion of this show, but the show as a whole. Sure there was men, but they were almost always at the mercy of Patty or latter-series Ellen. Strong and powerful women at the head of a cable show, isn’t that something? Yes, it was something. It was ‘Damages’.

Top 10 Returning TV Shows I’m Looking Forward To This Fall

1. ‘Homeland’

This was my favourite show of last year for so many reasons, and I could just gush on and on about how great it is. Once upon a time, ’24’ was not only my favourite TV show, but also, like, my favourite thing in the entire world. While my full thoughts on ’24’ will be left for some other time, I was thus excited that Howard Gordon (along with later ’24’ compadre’ Alex Gansa) were getting their own show on network’s older brother, cable. The cast is just utterly fantastic, with Claire Danes, probably my favourite actress, consistently knocking it out of the park, episode after episode. She is given every actors’ wet dream, playing a character with a disability (bi-polar), and even though it seems like awards bait, Danes grounds the disorder and makes it crushingly realistic when her disorder gets in the way of her job. She’s had the best Actress Emmy locked up for awhile now. Damian Lewis is very solid, perfectly playing someone who you feel like you can trust, all the while being the most suspicious person ever. Mandy Patinkin was also revived from wherever he’s been hanging out for the better part of 20 years and is terrific as well.

As cool as the premise is though, it pretty much begs to be told through a short 6-12 episode miniseries rather than a full-fledged series with an intent to go multiple seasons. From episode to episode, I never knew what to expect, as I legitimately did not no where they could go next, and the deaths of main characters seemed like a serious option. The first season played out the premise perfectly, but going forth into season two, I have no clue how they are going to maintain what they created as a lot played out and a fair bit was revealed. I’m insanely excited and nervous for season two, but that was the same position I was in before season one, so fingers crossed they pull it off again.

2. ‘Parenthood’

I actually love this show as much, and possibly more than ‘Homeland’, because it causes me no stress in watching it (unlike ‘Homeland’). I love to hang out with these characters and because it’s a family drama that’s set in a particular rhythm, I don’t have to be concerned about anyone dying (DON”T YOU DARE, KATIMS). I don’t mean to make this sound like a slight against the show, but there are few stakes here and nothing really makes you feel for the safety of these characters. It’s just terrific emotional resonance, with the goings-on of a large family which may not have life-and-death consequences, like most shows, but can faithfully deliver moments that hit hard. This show is a nice safety net where I can tune in and be moved and care for these characters but still be confident that no huge twists or left-field plot movements will occur. It’s a small family drama and I absolutely love it for that. I’m looking forward to spending more time with the Braverman clan (even if NBC doesn’t think it’s worth a full episode order!).

3. ‘The Good Wife’

If you told me in early September 2009 that ‘The Good Wife’ would be one of my favourite shows for the better part of three years (and counting), I would have thought you were smoking something illegal. I’ve always liked Juliana Margulies and knew absolutely nothing about the series going in, besides Juliana’s sweet, sweet locks. Anyways, it’s procedural nature was a bit of a turn off, but it eventually turned into one of the smartest shows on TV and became not only the best show on network television, but one of the best shows on any channel. The cast is fantastic with its incredibly sprawling guest cast filled to the brim with depth and skill. I usually don’t look forward to case-of-the-week shows, but this is the grand exception, with intelligent cases and resolutions, as well as compelling running storylines. Season three wasn’t as great as season two, but it made some nice steps that make me very excited (Margulies’ robot acting aside), for what Robert and Michelle King will deliver in season four.

4. ‘Treme’

It’s been over a year since we’ve had a new episode of ‘Treme’ and that’s a damn shame. Not that many people watch this show or even know about it, but I’m a huge proponent of it. I’m a big David Simon and it’s hyperbole by now, but, ‘The Wire’ is the best show of all time (okay, not really, ‘The Simpsons’ is the best show of all time, but whatever). Man, the culture and passion that bubbles out of this show is incredibly infectious and a breath of fresh air in a progressively clogged and arrogant-glut of storytelling where apparently characters don’t matter as much as story. ‘Treme’ isn’t the most story-driven show, nor does it want or need to be, just like the ‘The Wire’, it’s filled with characters who feel real, because, well, they’re all usually based on someone real, but also, they are always so faithful and true to their characteristics. The culture of New Orleans is the real star of this show and it’s incredible that each episode can capture so much of New Orleans and do justice to this wonderful yet tortured city, trying to rebuild both physically and culturally in the wake of the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina. As this is New Orleans, music is a co-star as well, and the aside musical performances put ‘Glee’, ‘Smash’ and others to complete shame. Jesus, if nothing else, watch this show for the music, I dare you to try and not sing along to the theme song. I’m looking forward to what David Simon and company have cooked up for season three, should be good, just hope there’s some other people watching as well.

5. ‘Fringe’

Now, here ‘Fringe’ starts to get a bit dicey. I enjoyed season four, I didn’t love it, and I didn’t hate it like some people did. Fan reaction seems to be pretty mixed on the season as a whole but it was pretty decent to me, although not as great as season three, probably the best season. I kind of respect ‘Fringe’ for what they did in season four, even though they kind of made the first three seasons non-existent and re-invented certain elements with everybody being technically “new” characters. I won’t go in to detail but whether you or I think they pulled everything off correctly, I respect the hell out of Wyman and Pinkner for doing something on a show that I’ve never seen before. Seeing as how next season is for sure going to be the last, and they supposedly have a game plan in order, I’m looking forward to what the last 13 episodes of ‘Fringe’ brings.

6. ‘Boardwalk Empire’

Season one of “Boardwalk” was fine, nothing special, but a decent series, albeit with some too obvious symbolism. The beginning of season two started out much the same, but later grew into a show that was more confident in itself, its characters and the types of stories it told. Without spoiling things, “Boardwalk” didn’t pull any punches towards the end and delivered a string of great episodes that changed the fabric of the show leading into season three that lesser shows would have backed out on. With some of the decisions that were made creatively in the latter episodes of the season, “Boardwalk” earned a lot of credit with me. I’m genuinely interested to see how everything will play out now with a shift of power and reverberations that will be felt throughout the whole show, and can’t be taken back (hopefully). Terence Winter did work on ‘The Sopranos’ after all, I’d say we can trust him.

7. ‘Parks & Recreation’

Now, I’m afraid my thoughts on this show aren’t very deep except for, it’s the funniest show on TV (actually, besides ‘Archer’). I thought the season four plotline of Leslie running for office was okay, but not as great as season 2 and season 3 were. But, beyond a few hiccups in the season, no other show makes me laugh like this one, and makes me care about all the characters at the same time, so I look forward to any and all “Parks & Recreation”, especially Andy and Tom.

8. ‘Glee’

Yeah, I said it, GLEE! But, not because it’s good or going to be good or anything. This show just fascinates the hell out of me. I have seen every episode, but I kind of hate it (not kind of, I do) and 90% (that other 10% is Britney and staring at Naya Rivera) of the characters annoy me. It’s just that there occasionally there are specific moments and scenes that really hit and are legitimate remnants of a show that once could have been. The last two episodes of season three were literally pretty great and just frustrate me even further with this show. It’s the most schizophrenic show going from semi-good to terrible to great in a matter of scenes and moments. There’s no consistency with the show and it seems like Ryan Murphy and company forget important details from episode to episode, but I keep on watching. The music is  pretty bad and I usually have no clue what new song they’re singing, so it keeps me in the wind and unable to connect with any of their lip-syncing, Britney Spears calibre or not. Next season they’re splitting time between NYC and Ohio as some students graduate to college as the others stay in Ohio. Ryan Murphy seems to think it’s going to be revolutionary how they split the time and all, ummm it isn’t, you’re just cutting back and forth like every other show has done with separate locations. It’ll probably suck, but for some reason I’ll keep watching. Help!

9. ‘The Office’

Seasons 2-5 of ‘The Office, were legitimately pretty great (at least my memories a little hazy when the it started getting bad, or at least less consistent), but everything else than that was pretty lazy with the occasional good episode sprinkled in between. It was once one of my favourite shows, and sadly I still hold the dimmest of candles for it even though it’s pretty bad now and a shadow of it once was. Season 8 was the pinnacle of disappointment with no direction shown, and a real sense of not caring about what this show once was. It was just a lazy season of television with no feeling of a need to make any forward progression, even though it desperately need it, of all seasons. Season nine will be its last, with former showrunner Greg Daniels to return as showrunner who promises a return to form, the answering of long-lingering questions and actual story/character arcs. Will they succeed at all of this? I don’t know, probably not fully at least, but like  ‘Glee’, I’m looking forward to the chaos ahead, for some reason.

10. ‘Community’

Let me say this right off the bat, I like ‘Community’, but I don’t love ‘Community’. I know lots of people (well people on the internet, nobody ever talks about it beyond the confines of the interwebz) are obsessed with this show and think it’s the greatest thing ever. Don’t get me wrong, I have flat-out loved episodes, but I still don’t think it’s really all that special of a show. I respect and mostly like the random and weird places Dan Harmon took the show, and the way he and company structured or created new ways of telling his stories within the sitcom format. I think it gets to be a bit of a crutch at times and they’ve relied on these “different” and form-breaking episodes to much in order to coast on nostalgia and post-modernism, albeit effectively. But, when it becomes too much of the shows identity is where it comes off as more surface-based flair, and less substance beneath.

On the other hand, there were several episodes that did seem to create a deeper resonance by testing the bonds of these characters and that through line became more interesting (to me anyways) than whatever “event” type episode they had, or whatever they were spoofing. I think with Dan Harmon leaving that some of these deeper relations between the characters and their connections to each other, and how they rely and depend on each, no matter if they show it on the surface or not, will be lost. Harmon seemed to be providing some of the darker and deeper elements that put strains on character relationships and really made each member of the study group evaluate each other and how they themselves fit in. It seems like without Harmon’s guiding hand, it’ll become more of a broad comedy, with a bigger emphasis on wacky episodes and elements, while doing away with the majority of the bubbling under of real feelings. While it’ll still probably be a competent and funny show, I fear that this will be as far as it goes, losing some of its depth of what made several of its episodes some of the best in the form from these past couple of years.