‘Suicide Squad’: Review

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For a movie that suffers in literally every aspect it might be kind of weird to say, but the chief overshadowing problem of Suicide Squad is that everybody is just trying too damn hard. Every aspect of this film is just lambasted in trying to make everything so “cool” and “different” that is just becomes so muddled that none of it work. One of the biggest problems for me was the dialogue, this movie is literally written seemingly in the hopes of making every line stand out as some kind of meme-y flip on standard dialogue. Nobody just talks normally with basic word choices and phrases (that’s not a bad thing!), nope, every line has to be flipped into some cutesy little saying because this movie needs to remind you at every second how “edgy” and against the grain they are. None of it works and it backfires amazingly. This is the through line of the entire film.

The plot suffers from the same thing, it’s actually pretty simple at the base of things, but because this movie can’t do anything straight it makes it into a confusing mess that never really makes sense. An archeologist gets possessed by a witch after touching some funky idol, then said witch flips on everybody, holds the city hostage and unleashes a bunch of monsters. That’s it, I mean the story doesn’t mean anything, because the whole point of this movie is just to watch the “Suicide Squad” do crazy shit, crack one-liners and kill people.

The most amazing thing about the plot of the movie is the whole acquiring and purpose of the “Suicide Squad” in the first place. Alright, so, get a load of this, the government wants to assemble a group of metahumans to protect against other metahumans and superheroes in case any of them go bad, so of course they decide to pick a bunch of criminals??? It’s never outlined why they decided to pick criminals, people who would have no reason to want to help the government (besides sentences reductions that are minimal), is there not other “good” superheroes you could’ve rounded up. And not only that, it’s not like they train these dudes or let them in on anything, god forbid they plan for these people and set out plans. Nope, when shit goes down they just break them out of their jail cells throw them into the wild and go “save us, guys!” and then wonder why everything goes to shit. The greatest example of this is why the hell is Harley Quinn in this group, she has no special powers or anything like Deadshot’s amazing aim or El Diablo’s fire or Killer Croc’s strength, nope, she’s just a crazy girl with a baseball bat. It makes zero sense why they would field a legit crazy person with no discernible “superhero” advantages when literally any basic human solider would’ve been a better option. She literally becomes one of the major downfalls and distractions of the group with her all Joker business. Viola Davis is terrible at her job, basically, is what this paragraph is getting at.

This, also, might be the most on-the-nose movie I’ve seen in recent memory, especially when it comes to its cliched jukebox of a soundtrack. Right from the outset its song after song that seems like it was placed in the film after someone googled “what are the most popular rock songs that have been done to death in movies over the last 50 years” and just compiled them all in one place. You got The Rolling Stones, AC/DC, CCR Black Sabbath, The White Stripes, Queen etc. etc. that all come in places that just blatantly seem like the director screaming at you “Hey! Isn’t this sooo cool and badass, like, the lyrics and song titles completely fit what’s going on on screen!” It’s hilarious and I could foresee a dangerous drinking game where you take a shot each time an on-the-nose classic rock choice pops up.

Let’s wrap up and talk about the performances for a minute, which, yep, were pretty uniformly bad. Actually, let’s start with the good, Will Smith was fantastic in this, without a doubt. I don’t know if it was that Will Smith was doing such a great job or that everybody else was so terrible, or both, but it was so painfully clear watching him in this that he was actually trying and so much so that he seemed like he was in a completely different movie. Margot Robbie was even worse than I expected as Harley Quinn to the point where I physically cringed whenever she came on the screen, especially with her one-liners in her horrible accent that always featured a second or two pause at the end like she was waiting for the audience’s laughing reaction that never came. Jared Leto as the Joker is another prime example in this movie of trying to hard and coming out on the opposite end of making this crazy person seem so try hard that he wasn’t even scary or “crazy,” just laughable in what he thought that meant. I’m a big Joel Kinnaman fan, but unfortunately try as he might the script and what he was asked to do didn’t really do him any favours and he suffered under the might of it. Jai Courtney has my favourite performance, not because he was good or anything, but because he literally plays a stereotype of an Australian complete with a boomerang weapon and rampant alcoholism and even greater than that his character literally contributes nothing to the movie in plot, character or worthwhile comedic way.

I’m a gigantic David Ayer fan and have love everything he’s ever done, but dude ripped off all the chains and delivered this over-saturated mess that plays like your 13-year-old brother’s favourite video game. It’s actually kind of amazing that this film of this magnitude fails on so many levels where eventually it just becomes a snowball effect with everything latching on and just building in how bad it is with everything coming together in a giant mess that was telegraphed from the opening frames of the movie. The greatest strength of this movie is Will Smith acting and portraying a real person amidst the chaos of all this pageantry, it’s just too bad that everything else was more concerned with the flash and pomp of creating a cool-looking 2 minute video game trailer than an actual movie with purpose and motivation.

WCW Monday Nitro/PPVS: 1995

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I’m finally watching WCW and I could not be more excited for my eventual descent into madness. Since Nitro started in September of 1995, this post is going to be pretty short and basically just my brief, random thoughts about my introduction to actually watching WCW. I’m just going to outline the PPVs quickly, since that follows the majorly storylines and then just tack on random thoughts at the end.

The first PPV is Fall Brawl where the heavyweights of the company (literally and figuratively), Hulk Hogan, Randy Savage, Lex Luger and Sting, take on literally the biggest four geeks you can think of compared to those guys in Kamala, The Zodiac, The Shark and Meng. Literally my first WCW PPV and that being the main event is the most WCW thing ever, it’s amazing. Even in the WarGames stipulation, which doesn’t do anything for me, it was amazingly lackluster. Really just a means to an end to jumpstart the Hogan/Giant feud with the Giant interrupting at the end.

Halloween Havoc has another of the most amazing WCW things ever, and in theory I’m a newbie to all this, where Hulk Hogan and Giant face off in monster truck battle, as in they actually ram actual monster trucks against each other for five minutes before their wrestling match. They of course scrap afterwards which leads Giant to follow off the dang building and plummet to his untimely death. Except that doesn’t happen and he just shows up on time for his match later in the show with no explanation of how he recovered and looking no worse for wear. This company is amazing.

World War 3 has a 60-Man battle royal that encompasses three rings because goddamn does this company love gimmick matches. This was the biggest cluster I’ve ever seen where you literally could not focus on anything. They had a split screen showing all three rings, including separate commentary, but it only really made the whole thing that much more confusing. Randy Savage won for some reason.

Starrcade was pretty cool because of the whole Americans vs. Japanese world cup thing, where giving us Jushin Liger vs. Chris Benoit as an opener pretty much is tantamount for nothing ever being able to top that. It’s also crazy to see Tenzan wrestle here in 1995 as me in 2016 is watching him in what probably will be his last G1 tournament. He’s so young then! The Ric Flair vs. Sting vs. Lex Luger match was entertaining, and especially because it got Flair the title later which is all I ever want to see.

Chris Benoit, Eddie Guerrero, Dean Malenko and Brian Pillman are so awesome in their own similar and unique ways and I could watch them all day and am so looking forward to their actual good matches among the terribleness that often surrounds it all.

Disco Inferno is the greatest gimmick ever because it’s dated as hell in 2016 and even in 1995 it was dated as hell.

I love watching Ric Flair on my TV screen no matter what he is doing. His promos are the best and him just being a heel all the way through is the greatest.

I’m relatively unfamiliar with actually seeing Lex Luger and his character, body, matches and all that and oh my god it’s so apparent right from the jump that he just doesn’t have IT to be the star that people thought he could be. Obviously, he has the insane body, but his mic skills and work in the ring is just so subpar. He’s just the most bland dude who always seems bored and like his mind is always half somewhere else.

Hulk Hogan is John Cena and John Cena is Hulk Hogan where dude will be main eventing one week and then he’ll just disappear off TV for a couple weeks then reappear like nothing happened. I can’t stand Hogan, but it’s entertaining watching him through all this.

I’m well on my way into 1996 now as I write one, so hopefully I’ll have more to say for that write-up, whenever I finish it, and hopefully I remember to take notes.

NXT: TakeOver: Dallas: Review/Recap

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American Alpha Defeated The Revival to win the NXT Tag Team Championship:

This was a great match to kick things off with, with the crowd always getting energized by American Alpha. They were of course going to win with the big push they’ve been getting, along with the even bigger reception from the audience. The Revival was always going to be a stop-gap championship team, because it’s not that they are particularly bad it’s just that they are so unmemorable and have absolutely nothing to make you feel true love or hatred either way, they’re so faceless voids that make you pause for a second to remember which one is Dawson and which one is Wilder.

Austin Aries Defeated Baron Corbin:

I’m a big Austin Aries fan and have really been liking Baron Corbin over these last few months as he’s been improving mightily, especially putting together some nice promos. Aries got the win, which I guess was expected, but I kinda thought Corbin might pull it out in a surprise as a sort of furthered push on his growing character, but I’m not mad at Aries getting his first win in his first match as an older guy. I knew Aries was a smaller guy and of course Corbin is huge, but jeez, Aries looked like a baby trying to attack a giant in this match, which was a great visual in Aries trying to take down this beast. Like, I said, I’ve been impressed with Corbin lately and think he has good potential in filling out a monster heel role, so I’m looking forward to seeing what he delivers in the next couple months.

Shinsuke Nakamura Defeated Sami Zayn:

Charisma’s a weird thing where you can obviously detect it, but it’s sometimes impossible to pinpoint exactly what it is and exactly how you can get it and fully utilize it. However complicated and undefined it may be, one thing for sure is that Shinsuke Nakamura has it in spades just after one second of entering an arena. He lives the cliche of looking up “charisma” in the dictionary and it’s just a picture of him.

The match itself was a well-booked masterclass in ring psychology in two geniuses in their own right. Little things like Zayn kicking out at one early in the match and then progressing through the match where he would then kick out at two as he got tired were nice small touches that unfortunately you don’t see much of nowadays where guys will get an unrealistic near-fall pin after a simple early suplex. That was a great thing about the match, they really played up the tired and exhausted angle as you would expect in any match really, but since it’s so rarely done, and especially to the level like this, it really played well into the big match factor. Nakamura got the pin, of course, and Sami went out on his back in his last NXT match, but really who better to do it to than Nakamura.

Asuka Defeated Bayley to win the NXT Women’s Championship:

After the last match I was a little worried what would follow since they were guaranteed to be in a lull after all the emotion spent in the Nakamura/Zayn contest. Fortunately, the crowd wasn’t that deflated and had some energy, although it wasn’t anything noteworthy. This was a pretty good match, through and through, but the ending was pretty weird and very anticlimactic. Asuka kept trying to put Bayley in her choke submission and once she finally got it cinched it looked to set up the idea that it looked like Bayley was done for only to see her miraculously find her way out of the move, except that totally didn’t happen here and instead Bayley just passed out and like that we have a new champion.

It wasn’t that it was a surprise or unexpected or anything to see Asuka walk away with the title, its just that how they finished the match in what looked to be an innocent move with the crowd fully expecting Bayley to wriggle out or the match to at least not end there, were shocked to see it finish like that when the crowd had to get their bearings for a few seconds to process what actually happened.

Bayley was seemingly going to lose the title sooner rather than later and Asuka was the perfect person to lose it to. Looking at the other women on the roster like Eva Marie, Nia Jax, Emma, Alexa Bliss and whoever, none of them are even close to the level of Bayley and are nowhere close to being believable in beating here. Whereas Asuka is this stone cold killer who wants nothing more than to wreck havoc on Bayley’s happy universe. And now I presume this will set up a redemption story for Bayley in getting here title back, because I really don’t see this title loss as freeing her up to go to the main roster, especially when the NXT women’s division is pretty thin and the main roster actually has a bunch of female talent who have the power to establish that division.

Finn Balor Defeated Samoa Joe to retain the NXT Championship:

I haven’t really been looking forward to this match until the last few weeks. And it didn’t really have anything to do with the participants, but with the rumours of what was going to the happen with the fallout with the idea that possibly the loser could be heading up to the main roster, along with the incoming Balor Club. I’ve tried and tried, but I really cant’ get into Finn Balor in any way, his ring work is fine enough, but his promos are just horrendous and often cringey. His title run has long grown stale and Balor as a babyface is just something that hasn’t worked well as he seems like someone which such little personality. I’m hoping the Balor Club institutes him turning heel and providing a spark to his character and at least lets them do some heel stuff with him which seems more naturally fitting to his character.

Thus, I thought Joe was for sure winning this thing and ushering in the age of bad ass Joe as champ. Joe is just the meanest looking guy on the roster and just personifies this animal in a cage mentality in every fight he’s in. The early blood that was drawn just adding fuel to that fire and provided a nice extra level in his menace. Unfortunately, because nowadays they medical staff have to be over every little bit of blood like a hawk, the momentum was severely halted in all the semi-stoppages and didn’t give the match the flow it had in the ending. It was unfortunate, but the match was still uniformly great throughout with both men believably until the very end in taking home the title. I have no clue what this means going forward, and am pretty disappointed that Balor will be retaining the title yet again, especially with rumours of his Balor Club direction popping up. Joe seems like the perfect guy to hold the belt for a bit until a younger guy makes his name by beating him for the title. But, maybe this all means that Joe is soon to see the main roster, and boy could they use not only his body, but strength at being a heel up there.

Overall I really liked the show and enjoyed it much more than the December show (although, it’s not like I hated that or anything). Not entirely sure of the direction of any of these guys after this, including their big guns like Nakamura, Balor and Joe, but they’e got gold in every one of them if they utilize them properly. Here’s hoping…

The Sameness Of Chuck Palahniuk

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Depending from where you’re coming from the problem (or attraction) of Chuck Palahniuk is that all his novels are about the same things and cover all the exact same themes over and over again. Sure, every author covers similar themes and ideas throughout their career due to the fact that they’re one singular person with a limited set of ideals and experiences that constantly get fed into their work. Where Palahniuk differs for me is that his repeated themes of parental issues, sexuality, addiction, shock value and satire of popular culture among others always resonate in the same way in each novel, generally consuming a main character and their troubles to deal with the outside world.

His first four novels from Fight Club to Survivor to Invisible Monsters to Choke literally just feels like he remade Fight Club three times over following the same idea of a troubled protagonist dealing with whatever sort of addiction, coupled with their messed up state of mind and daddy and mommy issues. Don’t get me wrong, Fight Club was a really good book and I enjoyed the small twists Choke did, but the rest of the novels felt like Palanhiuk just swapped out a few characters and a new locale and created a “new” book.

After those first four novels is where Palahniuk started to get real inventive and thus started his whole gimmick of each novel having some kind of weird and wacky narrative device to tell the story, whether it was a framing of interwoven short stories or an oral biography or a multi-POV perspective or a novel in broken english or whatever, Palahniuk had unlimited schtick it seemed to write a novel in. In one aspect I really loved this, because in the face of his first four books he now wasn’t keen to repeat the same boring narrative structure, but instead challenged himself and the reader to consume this media through whatever gimmick he had that intended to serve the material the best, whether it worked or not. I enjoyed the And Then There Were None aspect of Haunted, even if he didn’t quite pull it off in the end and thought the idea to do Pygmy in the broken English perspective of an exchange student was a perfect way to skewer culture and society. Others like Tell-All and Rant didn’t work too well, with a narration and oral history gimmick, didn’t work well because they weren’t interesting or engaging on either level of content or through any sort of device.

On the other hand of things the Palahniuk devices can become tiring because often its just a flashy cover for the same things we’ve been reading about all these years. It’s like a big budget Hollywood moving using amazing CGI and effects to distract you how bad the actual narrative of the film is at its core. That’s an extreme example, and I don’t feel like Palahniuk’s novels are bad, if anything very average, it’s just that often these narrative devices just seem like they become a gimmick just to be a gimmick and have no place rather than just for being a new and crazy way for Palahniuk to put out a new novel. Like I mentioned before, some work good, while others don’t amount to much at all. The one thing I really took away from reading his entire bibliography is that he has not one great or singular classic I could really take away. I guess you could argue for Fight Club (even though I like Lullaby the best), but there isn’t really a seminal piece of his work that rises above the others and thus it all just muddles into the same.

I think that’s the problem in the end, is that writing about all these same or similar things you’re going to get some good and bad novels, but nothing ever rises above that, and nothing a gimmick narrative device could ever improve. Another thing that Palahniuk is perhaps most widely known or thought of in the mainstream culture or with people who are only slightly familiar with him is his dark and explicit deceptions of sexuality and gruesome scenes. Again fitting in with what I’ve said before, his repetition of what he thinks is “shocking” behaviour that he thinks will get the reader all riled up just becomes predictable and old-hat after you read it for the tenth time, and just becomes a lame gimmick among many that falls flat and doesn’t achieve its desired effect.

Aside from my negative tone of the majority of the article, I really don’t dislike Palahniuk and actually think he’s a pretty good writer. His first two short story collections are pretty good (and I generally don’t really like short stories all that much) and demonstrated how good of a write he is when he’s not always depend on writing inside of a gimmick or in certain narrative thematic parameters. And I guess what it all comes down to is unevenness in his bibliography where I liked a bunch of his novels (Fight Club, Choke, Lullaby, Doomed), but hated many of the same (Survivor, Invisible Monsters, Tell-All) and was never left with that one definitive Palahniuk novel that rose above the rest.

‘Battlestar Galactica’: Season 4 Review

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Season four and the series ends with a drive towards the finish line from the start of the episodes and never lets up until all is revealed, for better or worse. I’m happy to say that what I hoped this season would be, in that it was a season of television focused on wrapping up and explaining what it had been building to this point with few distractions, was exactly what I got. Unlike in previous seasons there was less of the one-off episodes that just seemed to fill a hole or expound upon the ideals of a certain character, with this season focusing on the overall narrative of the series and attempting to wrap it up. Not that makes things particularly easier or anything, as this show had seemingly more storylines and mythology than I can easily recall at a glance, not limited to what the heck is ever up with Starbuck and her returning from the dead, the final five mystery Cylons, whatever is ongoing with Number Six and Baltar, Adama/Roslin, and then of course the whole thing about finding an “Earth” to settle on and whatever “force” is driving them to find it.

Ultimately, I kind of didn’t realize until they were on the downwind of things that the show indeed had a ton of mysteries and plot all going at once and driving headwards into a conclusion at the same time, which felt kind of clustered with a lot of reveals or explanations just thrown to the side or explained away in the most base way possible. I mean, like it or not you got explanations to overall mysteries, but the payoffs with how the Kara Strace character was revealed and the prominence of the Final Five did not seem to be equated to how they were built up or brandished to how important we were supposed to perceive them as. In the end the show bit off a bit more than it could chew, and like I’ve mentioned before, a more toned back and focused show (in both episodes and narrative content) would’ve made things work a lot better and allowed their main ideas to breathe and be developed more.

In the end it’s not like I was totally offended by how things ended so abruptly or without too much concern to being faithful to its buildup. As well, I was only committed to this show for a few weeks, compared with people who watched over years and had realtime commitment and expectations in a show that carried them this long with these mysteries only to underwhelm in explaining what largely the whole point of the show was. The majority of these endings being explained with some religious connotation whether some characters were “angels” or the entire fleet was being directed and influenced by some kind of god didn’t really alienate me or feel cheap to me because it still felt very much like a key tenant that this show believes in. The show from day one was always more interested in ideas of religion or spirituality in driving characters, being a framework for human civilization in whatever format (ie. on Caprica, Battlestar, new earth or whatever), and just largely being something that hung over the machinations of plot and any of the science fiction devices. It goes back to knowing that the show was far more interested in doing something beyond prototypical “science fiction” means, and sure near the end they compounded things too much, but it still remained faithful to what the show was, just that it seemingly came out of nowhere and became the forefront of answering away many of the show’s mysteries.

Coming away from the show I definitely have a greater appreciate for not only the show itself, but what can be done not only within the science fiction genre and within any genre where you take the basic tenants of it and either build something new off of it or use its typical framework against it. It managed to not only be a good science fiction show, but also a show that would’ve been just as good with the sci-fi elements devoid and removed from its fantasy metaphor and put in a real-world situation. I can’t say that I completely fell in love with the show or anything like that, but it was consistently good throughout its run where I can’t pick out a stretch or season that was particularly bad, but indeed it was quality from the outset. Battlestar Galactica was a show with a sci-fi backdrop that never intended to settle with being just that, and in doing so pushed it to become something that took elements from shows previous to it and morphed it into genre faire that was more about seeking answers and trying to understand what it means to be “human” and the relationships that falter or strive from this pursuit.

‘Battlestar Galactica’: Season 3 Review

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Season 3 of Battlestar Galactica sees the show in unfamiliar territory with the main action not taking place on the Battlestar, but instead shows the imprisonment on New Caprica and the efforts to escape. I enjoyed this little mini-arc that served as a nice breather as the show used to do more frequently in the beginning with placing the characters off the ship, so it was a nice change of pace to see the characters having to deal and interact with this new space. I would’ve even liked to see them stretch out this time on New Caprica and parse it a little more, but I understand them not wanting to dwell too much on this and get back to their status quo with adventures on the ship. Really, the whole idea of putting them on New Caprica was just a nice cliffhanger for the second season finale and something they easily remedied early in the third season, and not an actual game changer in the landscape of the show like I thought it would be, but one does wonder how it could’ve played out more largely to the overall end game of the show and not just a quick roadblock for an easy cliffhanger.

The rest of the season falls into a similar pattern from the second season. There’s a mix of bottle-esque episodes where a story will be largely self-contained within one episode mixed in with the episodes that push the series long storylines forward with their pursuit of earth, they mysteries behind Starbucks and what she possibly possesses in their quest for freedom and the quelling on inside and outside Cylon threats. Immediate Cylon attacks and confrontation seem to be a bit mellowed in this season where there is less one-on-one battle and meetings with them in their physical form, yet the show still manages to portray their threat in the continually wracked nerves and sanity of the crew, who seemingly keep getting stressed piled on top of them until it breaks. Thus, the show further explores the relationships between Starbuck/Apollo, Adama/Roslin along with Baltar/Number Six, which all work fine enough, but the way the show handles its relationships all seems very “high school” and immature at times with me. As a matter of fact the show feels like some teen drama at a high school at times with its petty dealings between the populous and dalliances between the crew.

While I enjoyed the switch between stand-alone episodes and series storyline pushing episodes, it felt very stop and start and by the end of the season there wasn’t all THAT much accomplished in the 20 episodes that really felt getting any closer to unlocking the what the show is supposedly driving toward. Really it was only the last couple of episodes that really pushed things along, with the Baltar trial (which was really good and my favourite stuff from the season possibly) and Starbuck’s disappearance. Its that sometimes the feels a lot more of a hangout-type of show with the stand-alone episodes seeming rather pointless and often feel just-like stop gaps or episodes the show had to fill until they could get back to the ones that pushed the plot forward. In that aspect I would’ve love to have seen the season episode orders shortened to 10-13, so the show could focus on moving the story along at a nice clip, without having to add in these filler episodes that stunted the momentum of the season.

I’m looking forward to season four, though, because they’ve done a pretty good job so far in teasing all these mysteries and secrecies behind finding earth and possible special forces living in certain characters pushing them to these certain places (BSG loves its religion analogies) and I’m sure we’ve still got more things to learn about the Cylons. I’m really hoping for a mad dash to the finish line with the show perfectly set up to wrap things up, especially with them not having been on for so long that they’ve worn out their welcome or haven’t compounded their mystery and complicated it by putting it through the wringer so many times that it doesn’t make sense anymore *ahem*Lost*ahem*, so basically don’t screw up this ending is what I’m saying.

‘Battlestar Galactica’: Season 2 Review

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Battlestar Galactica is the exact same show as The Office. I’m serious. Alright, not completely, but I couldn’t help but think of similarities between the two as I made my way through the second season of Battlestar. I knew coming in and from what the first season laid out that it was less going to be a “science fiction” show in the classic sense you might expect of them visiting new planets each episode, battling aliens (Cylons in this case) in epic battles all the time and just generally combating with various fantastical concepts and beings. Yes, there is a portion of that in the show, but largely a lot of this season concerns just the goings on on the Battlestar ship and all the drama, tension, fights and so on that would just naturally occur from these people basically creating a new world on this lone fleet that are constantly in danger, heightening all the emotions.

Where The Office gives you a comedic take on the slice of life and inter-office happenings of a local paper company, Battlestar Galactica gives you a dramatic (and sometimes comedic) slice of life and inter-office happenings of the last remaining humans on a spaceship trying to find refuge and avoiding the cyborg beings that eliminated the majority of their race. Both take on the same concept, just in slightly different ways. Battlestar doesn’t need to be visiting a new planet each week and encountering new races and having epic dog fight battle each week, they do have them, but it’s connection and building of these characters, their values and relationships actually make these moments when they are in peril from Cylon attacks or encounter something new and revolutionary to their cause mean that much more because of how well all the character and inter-relationship ties are woven together. I mean, sure, this show was on Sci-Fi after all, so it’s not like they had the budget to be going all out on epic science-fiction-y thing each episode, but even still the show’s not really about that.

It’s no secret and is largely what this show was founded on, but the science fiction backdrop of the show is really superfluous when you really get down to it, with all the themes and storylines the show develops so easily able to be lifted and placed onto any other real world dramatic show. Sometimes I feel the show hits it a little too on the head, largely with the whole analogy of the Cylons being some kind of invading sect like “foreigners” from another country and the danger they pose, like being compared as terror threat. The science fiction aspect on the other hand gives it a good dimension to explore societal topics like abortion, which doesn’t seem too shoehorned in just to give them an excuse to debate the sides of the issue. The world of the show that has been set-up allows this abortion debate to actually mean something within the show with the deepening debate of whether they should keep a baby alive because it’s a live being, going against the fact that it’s a Cylon (the things out to kill them). A lot of the societal parallels are very blatant and on the nose, and I mean it’s hard not to be because if you just subtract the presence of the Cylons and the establishing shots to show this is in space, the show just looks like any government drama you see dealing with real world problems, because these are all real world problems, they just sometimes have to deal with cyborgs. Also, the show makes no qualms that it’s a lot more interested in telling stories of power struggles, political dealings and how the human condition reacts in extended periods of peril over the constant shoot ‘em up alien fights you might expect from some a show like this without knowing much about it.

Season two works well because it balances all of its elements quite well. There’s a lot of episodes just concerning the inner-goings on of the ship and the dueling powers, that largely just develops the people and their motives, which sometimes comes close to spinning its wheels, but then they’ll throw in some episodes that push the plot along, or begin to unravel or reveal things that’ll play out in full later. The ending of the season does well to highlight this and also assure that they’re not content with keeping the status quo that was maintained throughout the season of being removed from a huge Cylon threat. As soon as we think the people have found a worthy planet capable of habitation the Cylons are right on their track, taking over the planet and imprisoning all of our characters as the season ends. That’s something I continually love about this show, how it constantly gives the characters a brief moment of happiness or satisfaction and then the rug just gets pulled right out from under them. It does well to establish and further the condition of these people and how much of a constant threat the Cylons are even when they think they are free and clear. It’s just like any normal life really, just a series of highs and lows and learning to enjoy when you’re on top because the bottom could just be around the corner, and who knows what it will hold.